Anzeige

Archive

Endurance training reduces circulating asymmetric dimethylarginine and myeloperoxidase levels in persons at risk of coronary events

Journal: Thrombosis and Haemostasis
ISSN: 0340-6245
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1160/TH05-03-0158
Issue: 2005: 94/6 (Dec) pp. 1116-1344
Pages: 1306-1311

Endurance training reduces circulating asymmetric dimethylarginine and myeloperoxidase levels in persons at risk of coronary events

Bernhard Richter1*, Alexander Niessner1*, Martina Penka2 , Marija Grdi â 3 , Sabine Steiner 4 , Barbara Strasser 5 , Sophie Ziegler 4 , Gerlinde Zorn1 , Gerald Maurer1 , Vera Simeon-Rudolf 6 , Johann Wojta1 , Kurt Huber 1, 2
1 Department of Internal Medicine II, Division of Cardiology, Medical University of Vienna, Austria 2 Department of Cardiology and Emergency Medicine, Wilhelminen-Hospital, Vienna, Austria 3 Department of Medical Biochemistry and Hematology, Faculty of

Summary

Asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA), myeloperoxidase (MPO) and paraoxonase 1 (PON1) are directly involved in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis by modulation of oxidative stress and/or NO bioavailability. We aimed to assess whether endurance exercise which is known to be cardioprotective could beneficially affect these novel risk markers. Thirty-two subjects (31–68 yrs, 56% males) with elevated cardiovascular risk including ten patients with coronary artery disease volunteered for a supervised 12-week endurance training (196 ± 15 min/week).Their fitness evaluated by 2 km test runs improved significantly after training (pre: 17.3± 0.8 vs. post: 15.7± 0.9min, p<0.001). ADMA (pre: 0.94± 0.03 vs. post: 0.75± 0.04 µ mol l -1) and MPO (pre:296.8± 22.2 vs.post:185.7 ± 19.5 ng ml-1) serum levels decreased significantly by 17.6± 4.6% and 28.5± 7.5%, respectively, after training (both p<0.001).Their down-regulation was inversely correlated (ADMA: r=-0.609, p<0.001, MPO: r=-0.437, p=0.014) with the up-regulation of plasma cGMP levels (Cyclic-guanosine 3`,5`-monophosphate; pre: 1.6± 0.12 vs. post: 2.21± 0.2 µ mol ml-1, p=0.001) reflecting NO production. PON1 activity towards phenylacetate was not significantly influenced by training (pre: 133± 6 vs. post: 130± 5 µ mol ml-1min-1, p=0.375). In a matched inactive control group (n=16) ADMA, MPO, cGMP levels and PON1 activity did not change over time. ADMA, MPO and cGMP changes were significantly different between participants and controls (all p<0.05). Regular endurance exercise was successful in reducing the circulating levels of two promising cardiovascular risk markers, ADMA and MPO, in persons prone to cardiac events. These changes may result in numerous antiatherosclerotic effects such as improvement of NO bioavailability, reduction of oxidative stress and lipid peroxidation.